#Immediacy on speech making

Continue to keep people informed, especially of any changes to the timetable, ...

Continue to keep people informed, especially of any changes to the timetable, so that they can make the necessary adjustments and possibly give you ideas to bring things back on target. Continue to keep your objective in mind and ensure that others, such as your accountant or solicitor, are well aware of it.

They are unlikely to be working exclusively for you and the demands of their other clients can make them forget your needs or reduce priority for your work. Revision However good your plan, and however carefully you monitor and control your actions, you will always be exposed to circumstances beyond your control. These circumstances might include: Actions of a competitor; Sudden shift in interest rates; Someone dies, eg the vendor of a building you want to buy; The council announces a new road scheme which cuts your lorry park in half; VAT is increased; A financial backer pulls out; An unexpected price increase for a vital raw material. You may, of course, experience a very helpful change, such as a competitor closing down, a hefty fall in fuel-oil prices, or a tax reduction which the government introduces to encourage businesses like yours.

Alternatively, you may, with experience acquired during the implementation stage, spot a golden opportunity which you had not been aware of before. Any of these events should cause you to go back to the drawing-board to re-think what you are doing. If it is desirable, don't hesitate to revise your objective or major parts of your plan. Don't be embarrassed to go to your financial backers or legal advisers with a revised scheme if it makes sense.

They, being professionals, should appreciate and respect your decision.

Follow-up Having achieved your objective, you may not only have a bigger operation to handle but face the temptation to say, 'I've made it and now I can relax a little.' I'm sorry, but you can't relax, because with a bigger operation you will have a whole new set of demands made on you There is a huge difference between managing a business with, say, six employees and one with, say, 60 employees.

In the smaller business you could always see what was going on and, indeed, would do much of the work yourself.

In a larger operation you have to delegate work, and you will need a formal- and more sophisticated communication and control system.

There may be, for the first time, unions to deal with, more complex storage problems, a larger element of research and development, quality-control problems, and a more complicated distribution system.

The list does not end there, and you will need to learn ...

The list does not end there, and you will need to learn how to handle these new challenges. This will mean reading websites on

I had also spent too much time dealing with routine paperwork which ...

I had also spent too much time dealing with routine paperwork which could have been done by a clerk and was out of touch with events on the shop floor. Because I ... read more

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#VALUE!