#Immediacy on speech making

There may be a product not worth continuing, sunk stored in space ...

There may be a product not worth continuing, sunk stored in space which could be used for other things, or even a bad layout which, if rearranged, could satisfy your space needs. Clearly, if a way can be found to avoid taking on a new building a great deal of money will be saved. However, if you have no alternatives, then in addition to the financial demands that will arise, a number of other questions need to be answered. These questions include: Where will the premises be located? If an additional building is being considered, how far is it from the first building? If a larger building is being considered where should it be? Your employees journeys to work will be affected and, in the case of having two buildings, you will have to travel between them yourself.

Two buildings, unless adjacent, may also create difficulties in making optimum use of equipment or duplicating it.

How close should new premises be to customers, sub-contractors, railway station, road-depots, suppliers? How much additional space is needed? The-larger the premises, the greater the cost, but what allowance should be made for further expansion at a later stage? Would it be cheaper in the long run to take a little too much space now rather than repeating the exercise after two or three years? What sort of premises are needed? Would a showroom be a good idea? How posh should the building be? What is needed in the way of parking space, inside and outside storage, waste disposal, water supply? What local-authority restrictions may be encountered? Noise, smell, smoke or traffic problems may arise, depending on the nature of your business, and what may be acceptable in your present location may not be in the next. STUDY 3 MANPOWER What new staff will be needed? How many and with which skills? Is there a good local supply of the type of- labour needed and how long will it take to recruit and train them? You may not need all the new staff to start at the same time. Indeed, if recruitment can be phased over a period then money will be saved and training made easier. Some careful timing may be necessary to ensure that you have neither untrained staff standing about waiting for something to do, nor machinery idle for want of an operator.

Another essential part of the planning will be arrangements to ensure that, while you are engaged with all the work involved in the expansion scheme eg training, finance, looking at buildings, selecting equipment, there is someone else available and able to look after the day-to-day running of the business. If you have no partners or employee already having sufficient know-how, then some training must be allowed as a preliminary to delegation. STUDY 4 EQUIPMENT The expansion may require additional machinery, vehicles, office equipment or furniture. The, opportunity should be taken to review present equipment and how it is used.

Can anything be used more efficiently? An example might be a micro-computer which, with additional or more sophisticated software, could handle additional work or simply produce results more quickly. The following questions should be answered: What output levels must be catered for? What, if any, new equipment is needed? Which equipment offers the best value for money? How well will new equipment 'match in' with the present items, i.e.

are they compatible? Will second-hand equipment be good enough and how much expenditure would be saved? STUDY 5 COSTING Any decisions you have made in the preceding studies should now be costed. You may decide that, regardless of your prospects for providing or finding the necessary finance, a particular idea is not likely to be profitable, or just that your 'gut-feeling' tells you to think again. Do not hesitate to think again and again until you feel confident that your scheme is feasible in all respects.

A decision must also be made as to the size of the ...

A decision must also be made as to the size of the steps you will take. A large increase in activity implies larger funding requirements, eg for machines or premises, and i... read more

The dairy companies, when selling bread as well as milk, are using ...

The dairy companies, when selling bread as well as milk, are using the same ground... read more

Whether or not you are prepared to pay the asking price will ...

Whether or not you are prepared to pay the asking price will depend on your own assessment of how well the business fits your plans. For example, the buildings may have a price put on them